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dc.contributor.convenorJohn Wannaen_AU
dc.contributor.authorTiernan, Anne-Mareeen_US
dc.contributor.editorProfessor John Wannaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:57:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:57:42Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.modified2008-12-09T22:02:49Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/1353
dc.description.abstractAustralian prime ministers need advice and support. Recent incumbents have demonstrated a willingness to experiment with the institutions of advice, each attempting to create arrangements to enhance their capacity to do their job effectively and to achieve their particular agenda. The advisory arrangements developed by Gough Whitlam, Malcolm Fraser and Bob Hawke have been the subject of considerable scholarly attention and are now well documented. Interestingly, despite media speculation that there has been an acceleration towards greater partisanship and personalisation under the Keating and Howard prime ministerships (for example Dodson, 1996a; Sherman, 1998; Waterford, 1995;1996), the advisory arrangements of these recent two prime ministers have received comparatively little attention. This paper addresses itself to this gap in the literature by examining the arrangements supporting John Howard as prime minister. It describes the system of advice developed to meet the needs of Howard's prime ministership. In describing and documenting Howard's advisory arrangements, this paper builds on earlier contributions by Walter (1986; 1992) and Weller (1985; 1987; 1989a; 2000). Intended as context for the Advising Ministers panel, it aims to provide a basis for assessing the current state of evolution of prime ministerial advisory systems in Australia.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent105014 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.auspsa.org.au/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofbookorjournalAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) Conferenceen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2001-09-24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2001-09-26en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationQueensland Parliament Houseen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360101en_US
dc.titleSources Close to the Prime Minister: Advisory Arrangements Under John Howarden_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2001. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2001
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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