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dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Belindaen_US
dc.contributor.editorBelinda McKayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:33:34Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:33:34Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-06T05:52:20Z
dc.identifier.issn13218166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13671
dc.description.abstractIn late nineteenth and early twentieth century Brisbane, writing as a profession became increasingly open to women. This phenomenon developed partly in response to a rapidly expanding urban female audience, but in turn it helped to form the tastes, reading habits and social attitudes of new generations of female readers. The prolific and popular poet, Emily Coungeau exemplifies a new, self-consciously cosmopolitan type of woman writer who emerged in Brisbane in the early twentieth century. The English born Coungeau's life story is of interest on several different levels. Her remaking of herself in Queensland from lady's companion and parlour maid into successful businesswoman, poet, and patron of the arts demonstrates the transformative possibilities for women of migration to the colonies. Her involvement in commerce and culture over many decades also sheds light on Brisbane life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Finally, Coungeau is of interest because her articulation of an urban, cosmopolitan, female aesthetic in her writing relies heavily on notions of race and culture that are discredited today.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent951070 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Queensland Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeSt. Lucia, Qlden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/arts-languages-criminology/centre-public-culture-ideas/publications/queensland-reviewen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom13en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto33en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQueensland Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420299en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode430101en_US
dc.titleFinding Voice: Emily Coungeau and 'Australia's National Hymn of Progress'en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006 University of Queensland Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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