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dc.contributor.authorCumming, Joyen_US
dc.contributor.authorD. Mawdsley, Ralphen_US
dc.contributor.editorJ. J. Cumming & Elizabeth Dicksonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:50:24Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:50:24Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2011-04-05T07:02:07Z
dc.identifier.issn13277634en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13741
dc.description.abstractThe United States has an extensive history of encouraging and protecting the rights of parents to make educational decisions for their children. The notion that parents speak for their children has been a longstanding, important value undergirding the operation of American public schools and early courts developed common law principles in support of this concept. Beginning in Meyer v Nebraska, the United States Supreme Court enshrined this common law concept that parents could make educational decisions for their children as a constitutional right under the liberty clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In the intervening eight decades, the Supreme Court and other federal courts have wrestled with interpreting how this constitutional right should be balanced with the emerging post-Tinker v Des Moines Independent School District constitutional rights of students and the post-Hazelwood School District v Kuhlmeier right of school districts to make reasonable curriculum decisions even if they limit student expression. Complicating this constitutional balancing is how courts should address the rights of students where those rights may conflict with the educational choices of parents. To the extent that courts recognise the choices of students over those of their parents, the nature of the parent-child relationship as developed under common law and enshrined in the liberty clause has been dramatically altered.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent357932 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralia and New Zealand Education Law Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.anzela.edu.au/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom37en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto54en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2/1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralia and New Zealand Journal of Law and Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10/11en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330104en_US
dc.titleStudent rights and parent rights in education in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006 Australia & New Zealand Education Law Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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