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dc.contributor.authorMoston, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorEngelberg, Associate Professor Terry
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, James
dc.contributor.editorBob Stewart and Michael Burke
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T02:37:36Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T02:37:36Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.isbn9780987477613
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/138271
dc.description.abstractThe recent revelation that Lance Armstrong was doping (USADA, 2012) caught many in the media and sporting worlds by surprise. However, like many other supposed exposés, the revelations were simply confirming ongoing suspicions. Walsh (2012) for instance, provides a telling historical review of drug use in professional cycling. The Armstrong affair is especially important, though, since several important themes emerge from an analysis of the media coverage given to the release of the USADA report. First, Armstrong appears to have never failed a doping test. Actually, that is not entirely true but this is a popular meme in the retelling of the Armstrong story so we will let that pass. Second, Armstrong was not alone and many other elite cyclists were also doping. Whilst we cannot be certain, ‘many others’ does not equate to ‘all others’. Third, while the strategies used by Armstrong and his colleagues to evade detection were the result of careful planning, it would probably be wrong to think of Armstrong as some form of criminal mastermind. For a wide range of reasons, the anti-doping agencies and sporting bodies were, to all intents and purposes, remarkably easy to outwit. Given these themes, many are asking whether it is now time to reassess the following question: should doping be legalized?
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherDry Ink Press
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleDrugs and sport: Writings from the Edge
dc.relation.ispartofchapter5
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom125
dc.relation.ispartofpageto153
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForensic Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170104
dc.titleNon-analytical positives: Forensic Interviewing and the detection of doping in sport
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicAfter all reasonable attempts to contact the copyright owner, this work was published in good faith in interests of the digital preservation of academic scholarship. Please contact copyright@griffith.edu.au with any questions or concerns.
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Dry Ink Press. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorEngelberg, Associate Professor Terry PT.


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