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dc.contributor.authorPatapan, Haigen_US
dc.contributor.authorKane, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.editorRichard J. Stillman, II editor in chiefen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:47:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:47:43Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-05T06:03:20Z
dc.identifier.issn00333352en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1540-6210.2006.00636.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13931
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that the concept of prudence can provide valuable insights into the problems of the New Public Management. Prudence, or practical wisdom, is the ability to make sound decisions under complex, ever-changeable conditions. Old-style bureaucracy severely limited the discretion of most administrators but preserved a site of true prudential judgment at the peak where discreet "mandarins" policed the boundary between politics and administration. The reforms that inaugurated New Public Management dismantled this site of prudence while simultaneously attempting, in effect, to disperse prudential judgment and action throughout the service. Though raising the problem of prudence, these reforms misconceived it as the problem of how to balance new freedoms with new controls to prevent abuse or folly. This essay argues that the introduction of market mechanisms, risk-management and cost-benefit techniques, ethics training, performance accountability, and calls to leadership were destined to fail because they misapprehended the problem of prudence.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0033-3352&site=1en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom711en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto724en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPublic Administration Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume66en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360202en_US
dc.titleIn Search of Prudence: The Hidden Problem of Managerial Reformen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

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