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dc.contributor.authorHollander, Robynen_US
dc.contributor.editorHelen Ross & Grant Wardell-Johnsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:25:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:25:59Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-12T23:14:48Z
dc.identifier.issn14486563en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/14020
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, governments have shifted away from traditional command and control regulation in favour of more flexible approaches built on notions of trust and co-operation between the regulator and the regulated. Such approaches recognise the limitations of traditional methods in terms of both cost and efficacy, and rather than adopting a constabulary stance, attempt to engage with industry in a constructive way utilising economic incentives and the desire of most firms to 'do the right thing' most of the time. These 'light-handed' approaches work best when public and private interests converge, the degree of risk is low, and there is scope for third party oversight. The Tasmanian government has adopted this light-handed approach in its regulation of logging in native forests. Its Forest Practices System is built on industry co-operation where regulation is conceptualised as a partnership between government and business. This paper assesses the effectiveness of such an approach. It finds that the System has the capacity to overcome some of the hurdles to effective regulation, such as information asymmetry and industry opposition, but is limited in other respects because of a lack of transparency, the absence of third party oversight, the nature of the risk and the potential mismatch between public and private interests.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent280655 bytes
dc.format.extent63963 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEnvironment Institute of Australia and New Zealanden_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=200604296;res=APAFTen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom17en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralasian Journal of Environmental Managementen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode369999en_US
dc.titleLight-handed Regulation: The Case of the Tasmanian Forest Practices Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006. Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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