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dc.contributor.authorMalik, Ashish
dc.contributor.authorRowley, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-04T00:20:24Z
dc.date.available2018-05-04T00:20:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn9781138783188en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9781315768786en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141255
dc.description.abstractThe global impact of ‘offshoring’, including that of information technology (IT) and related services, to developing nations such as India has been a topic of great interest and debate to academics, practitioners and policymakers (Arora and Athreye, 2002; Arora and Gambardella, 2006; Arora, Arunachalam, Asundi and Fernandes, 2001; Athreye, 2004, 2005; Banerjee, 2004; Budhwar and Bhatnagar, 2009; Malik, 2009; Malik, Sinha and Blumenfeld, 2012; NASSCOM, 2014a; Thite and Russell, 2009). The high rates of technological change and increased competition have forced IT businesses and their managers to continuously reinvent their business models. It is through such constant renewal of business models and change management efforts of business leaders that the Indian IT industry has continued to sustain high levels of growth, even in a post-global financial crisis era (Malik, 2013). From humble beginnings in the early 1970s, the Indian IT industry has come a long way. Current estimates suggest that the Indian IT industry has revenues in excess of US$118 billion and employs around three million people (NASSCOM, 2014a, b, c). Numerous metaphors have been used to portray the growth story of India’s IT industry, for example, the ‘horse that flew’ (Vittal, 2004), the story of ‘blind men and the elephant’ (Rahman and Kurien, 2007) and ‘from underdogs to tigers’ (Arora and Gambardella, 2006) are among the most popular discourses. Our book is different from earlier expositions on the Indian IT industry (Arora and Gambardella, 2006; Banerjee, 2004; Budhwar and Bhatnagar, 2009; Thite and Russell, 2009). While these accounts have tended to focus on the supply and demand side dynamics of human capital and related explanations of growth, our collection differentiates on a number of fronts.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenglishen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781317667483/chapters/10.4324%2F9781315768786-9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleBusiness Models and People Management in the Indian IT Industry: From People to Profitsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto12en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150399en_US
dc.titleProfiting from people management practices: An introductionen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorRowley, Chris


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