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dc.contributor.authorWynd, Alex
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Paul
dc.contributor.authorGilson, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Graham
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-13T02:51:24Z
dc.date.available2017-10-13T02:51:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0005-0067
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ap.12124
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141287
dc.description.abstractObjective: Three possibilities may explain headache and depression comorbidity: (a) headaches cause depression; (b) depression causes headaches; and (c) third variables cause both. Evidence supports all three possibilities. This study sought to examine which of these has the most support among a sample of people seeking psychological treatment. Method: This was achieved firstly by establishing the order of onset of the most recent episode of headaches and depression, comparing these groups on headache severity, depression heritability, and exploratory variables, and asking participants open-ended questions. Thirty participants had been diagnosed with a primary headache disorder and major depressive disorder. The order of onset was assessed using the Life History Calendar, while depression heritability was estimated by probable depression in a parent. Results: Although the order of onset was statistically random, it was more frequent for participants to state that depression caused headaches than the reverse. Most participants identified life events or circumstances as contributing to both conditions. Unusually intense headaches may be contributing to depression in the headaches first group, although headaches causing depression may be infrequent. Conclusions: Successful headache treatment for individuals with major depressive disorder will most likely necessitate treatment of the comorbid depression. This study was limited by a small sample size.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom382
dc.relation.ispartofpageto391
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Psychologist
dc.relation.ispartofvolume50
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleInvestigating the Relationship Between Comorbid Headaches and Depression
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 The Australian Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Investigating the Relationship Between Comorbid Headaches and Depression, Australian Psychologist, Volume 50, Issue 5, October 2015, Pages 382–391, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/ap.12124 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMartin, Paul


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