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dc.contributor.authorBond, Christine EW
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Louise E
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T05:44:49Z
dc.date.available2018-07-20T05:44:49Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0925-4994
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10611-015-9587-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141365
dc.description.abstractDespite the prominent role that procedural justice has taken in policing research, we know surprisingly little about police perceptions of procedural justice as an effective tool in their encounters with members of the public. In this study, we start with a focus on the perceptions of police recruits in a major police service, exploring their perceptions of procedural justice and its role in policing. Using data from a questionnaire of 450 police recruits in the early stages of their initial training, we find that orientations supportive of procedural justice significantly predict reported intentions to use procedural justice approaches in interacting with others, as well as the prioritization of procedural justice responses to a typical policing encounter (traffic violation). We also find that belief in an obligation to obey the law is significantly associated with perceived procedural justice outcomes. We argue that early supportive orientations towards procedural justice may be important in understanding police officers’ future interactions with members of the public, promoting positive evaluations of justice among citizens, and minimizing the risk of coercive encounters involving officer use of force.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom229
dc.relation.ispartofpageto245
dc.relation.ispartofissue4-5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime, Law and Social Change
dc.relation.ispartofvolume64
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleProcedural justice in policing: the first phase of an Australian longitudinal study of officer attitudes and intentions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorPorter, Louise E.
gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Kristina
gro.griffith.authorBond, Christine E.


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