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dc.contributor.authorDoran, Christopher M
dc.contributor.authorLing, Rod
dc.contributor.authorByrnes, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorCrane, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorSearles, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Donna
dc.contributor.authorShakeshaft, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T04:54:07Z
dc.date.available2017-08-03T04:54:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-015-2267-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141380
dc.description.abstractBackground: Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. The increased incidence of skin cancer, combined with limited health care resources and tight budgetary conditions, has increased the importance of understanding the economic impact of skin cancer. This research estimates the economic cost of skin cancer in the Australian state of New South Wales. Method: An incidence based approach is used to estimate lifetime costs of skin cancer. Both direct and indirect costs are considered - direct costs include resources associated with the management of skin cancer and indirect costs refer to productivity costs associated with morbidity and premature mortality. Diagnosis of skin cancer was determined according to ICD-10 codes using principal diagnosis. Linked administrative data and regression modelling are used to calculate costs; presented as Australian dollars for the year 2010. The human capital approach is used to value present and future productivity losses. Results: The lifetime cost of the 150,000 incident cases of skin cancer diagnosed in NSW in 2010 is estimated at $536 million ($44,796 per melanoma and $2459 per non-melanoma). Direct costs accounted for 72 % of costs ($10,230 per melanoma and $2336 per non-melanoma) and indirect costs accounted for 28 % of costs ($34,567 per melanoma and $123 per non-melanoma). Direct costs are, on average, higher for females than males with indirect costs, on average, higher for males than females. Conclusion: This research provides new evidence on the economic cost of skin cancer and provides policy makers with information of the potential monetary savings that may arise from efforts to reduce the incidence of skin cancer.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom952-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto952-10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380108
dc.titleEstimating the economic costs of skin cancer in New South Wales, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© Doran et al. 2015. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorByrnes, Joshua M.


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