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dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Andrea P
dc.contributor.authorWake, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorWeisbrodt, Leonie
dc.contributor.authorDhaliwal, Rupinder
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Alan
dc.contributor.authorHeyland, Daren K
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-28T12:01:06Z
dc.date.available2017-11-28T12:01:06Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1036-7314
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aucc.2015.10.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141573
dc.description.abstractBackground: Critically ill patients are at risk of developing malnutrition which contributes to functional decline and hospital re-admission. Strategies to promote nutritional intake have had a modest effect on protein-calorie intake. None have addressed the recovery trajectory of critical illness or incorporated family as advocates. Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a family-centred intervention designed to optimise nutrition during and following recovery from critical illness. Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Two Australian adult intensive care units. Participants: A convenience sample of 49 patients and their families was recruited. Patients ≥18 years of age anticipated to require mechanical ventilation for at least 2 days were eligible, provided their family visited regularly and were able to communicate in English. Health care professionals including doctors (n = 4), nurses (n = 20) and dietitians (n = 2) also participated. Methods: Demographic data were obtained from participants. Recruitment and retention informed study feasibility. Individual and group interviews informed participant views on the acceptability, perception of and experience with the intervention. Inductive analysis was used to analyse qualitative data. Results: 187 (15.8%) patients met the eligibility criteria; 49 patients and 51 family members consented to participate for a 20.3% consent failure rate. We interviewed 33 (67.3%) family members and 13 (43.4%) patients, all of whom considered the intervention acceptable and who would participate in a similar intervention again, given the opportunity. Inductive analysis of qualitative data from all participants identified three themes: variability in in-hospital nutrition support, families as advocates for optimal nutrition, and partnering with health care providers. Conclusion: We described a feasible and acceptable family centred intervention that may be effective in promoting nutrition intake in critically ill patients. Further research is required to examine contextual factors impacting implementation of family-centred interventions, particularly those that involve active family participation and advocacy.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom68
dc.relation.ispartofpageto76
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Critical Care
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleA multi-faceted, family-centred nutrition intervention to optimise nutrition intake of critically ill patients: The OPTICS feasibility study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.rights.copyright© 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMarshall, Andrea
gro.griffith.authorWake, Liz


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