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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Kyra
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, Teagan
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Katherine M
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, David J
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Anne M
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T01:30:34Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T01:30:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1359-107X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjhp.12168
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141581
dc.description.abstractObjectives. Preschool-aged children spend substantial amounts of time engaged in screen-based activities. As parents have considerable control over their child’s health behaviours during the younger years, it is important to understand those influences that guide parents’ decisions about their child’s screen time behaviours. Design. A prospective design with two waves of data collection, 1 week apart, was adopted. Methods. Parents (n = 207) completed a Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB)-based questionnaire, with the addition of parental role construction (i.e., parents’ expectations and beliefs of responsibility for their child’s behaviour) and past behaviour. A number of underlying beliefs identified in a prior pilot study were also assessed. Results. The model explained 77% (with past behaviour accounting for 5%) of the variance in intention and 50% (with past behaviour accounting for 3%) of the variance in parental decisions to limit child screen time. Attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, parental role construction, and past behaviour predicted intentions, and intentions and past behaviour predicted follow-up behaviour. Underlying screen time beliefs (e.g., increased parental distress, pressure from friends, inconvenience) were also identified as guiding parents’ decisions. Conclusion. Results support the TPB and highlight the importance of beliefs for understanding parental decisions for children’s screen time behaviours, as well as the addition of parental role construction. This formative research provides necessary depth of understanding of sedentary lifestyle behaviours in young children which can be adopted in future interventions to test the efficacy of the TPB mechanisms in changing parental behaviour for their child’s health.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBritish Psychological Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.titleA psychosocial analysis of parents' decisions for limiting their young child's screen time: An examination of attitudes, social norms and roles, and control perceptions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 British Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: A psychosocial analysis of parents' decisions for limiting their young child's screen time: An examination of attitudes, social norms and roles, and control perceptions, British Journal of Health Psychology, Volume 21, Issue 2, Pages 285-301, 2016, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12168. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
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gro.griffith.authorHamilton, Kyra
gro.griffith.authorSpinks, Teagan


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