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dc.contributor.authorDunne-Proctor, Rachael L
dc.contributor.authorKenardy, Justin
dc.contributor.authorSterling, Michele
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T04:00:13Z
dc.date.available2018-07-20T04:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0749-8047
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/AJP.0000000000000309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141587
dc.description.abstractObjective: Whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) are common and incur substantial personal and economic costs. Research has shown that persistent posttraumatic stress reactions predict poorer functional recovery in WAD; however, the specific mechanism through which this occurs is unclear. The current study is the first to examine the direct impact of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in WAD using laboratory tested pain measures. Materials and Methods: A mixed experimental design was used to examine the impact of exposure to accident cues on chronic WAD individuals with (n=33) and without (n=39) PTSD. Groups were compared at baseline and postaccident cue on self-reported pain and negative effect and laboratory tested arousal and sensory pain threshold measures. Results: At baseline, WAD individuals with PTSD reported greater disability, negative effect, pain, arousal, and lower pain thresholds than those without PTSD. As expected, exposure to accident cues resulted in greater increases in arousal and negative effect for those with PTSD. Changes in sensory pain thresholds revealed a hyperalgesic effect in cold pain thresholds for the PTSD group compared with the No PTSD group and mixed findings for pressure pain thresholds. Discussion: Findings from the current study highlight the negative impact of PTSD on both physical and psychological outcomes in chronic WAD. From a clinical perspective, data suggest that patients exposed to accident cues may experience arousal that lowers their threshold to certain pain stimuli. Further investigation of effective multidisciplinary interventions and in particular the treatment of PTSD in WAD is identified as an important area of further investigation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto28
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Journal of Pain
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.titleThe impact of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on physiological arousal, disability, and sensory pain thresholds in patients with chronic whiplash
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 LWW. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Clinical Journal of Pain Volume 32 - Issue 8 - p 645–653, 2016. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSterling, Michele


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