Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohannot, Lidwineen_US
dc.contributor.authorSomerset, Shawnen_US
dc.contributor.editorMarilyn Tseng and Barry Margettsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:40:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:40:03Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2008-04-04T07:15:06Z
dc.identifier.issn13689800en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/14174
dc.description.abstractObjective: To estimate flavonoid intake in the Australian population. Design: Flavonoid consumption was estimated from 24-hour recall data and apparent consumption data using US Department of Agriculture flavonoid composition data. Subjects: The National Nutrition Survey 1995 assessed dietary intake (24-hour recall) in a representative sample (n 젱3 858) of the Australian population aged 2 years and over. Results: Analysis of the 24-hour recall data indicated an average adult intake (.18 years) of 454mgday21 (92% being flavan-3-ols). Apple was the highest quercetin source until age 16-18 years, after which onion became an increasingly important prominent source. Variations in hesperetin consumption reflected orange intake. Apple, apricot and grapes were the major sources of epicatechin and catechin for children, but subsided as wine consumption increased in adulthood. Wine was the main source of malvidin. Naringenin intake remained static as a percentage of total flavonoid intake until age 19-24 years, corresponding to orange intake, and then increased with age from 19-24 years, corresponding to grapefruit intake. Apparent dietary flavonoid consumption was 351mgperson21 day21, of which 75% were flavan-3-ols. Black tea was the major flavonoid source (predominantly flavan-3-ols) representing 70% of total intake. Hesperetin and naringenin were the next most highly consumed flavonoids, reflecting orange intake. Both 24-hour recall and apparent consumption data indicated that apigenin intake was markedly higher in Australia than reported in either the USA or Denmark, presumably due to differences in consumption data for leaf and stalk vegetables and parsley. Conclusions: Tea was the major dietary flavonoid source in Australia. Flavonoid consumption profiles and flavonoid sources varied according to age. More consistent methodologies, survey tools validated for specific flavonoid intakes and enhanced local flavonoid content data for foods would facilitate better international comparisons of flavonoid intake.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent464135 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherThe Nutrition Societyen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PHNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1045en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1054en_US
dc.relation.ispartofedition2006en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPublic Health Nutritionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321205en_US
dc.titleAge-related variations in flavonoid intake and sources in the Australian populationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Healthen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2006 The Nutrition Society. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJohannot, Lidwine
gro.griffith.authorSomerset, Shawn M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record