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dc.contributor.authorSchaefer, Lacey
dc.contributor.authorEck, John E.
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Francis T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-12T01:30:58Z
dc.date.available2018-10-12T01:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-932582-85-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/141949
dc.description.abstractThe routine convergence of three elements is necessary for a persistent crime problem: offenders, targets, and places. In addition, people who would normally prevent those crimes—controllers—must be missing or ineffective. This basic formula is often depicted by the crime problem triangle (see Figure 1). The elements in the inner triangle are necessary for crime, and the controllers in the outer triangle are sufficient for the prevention of crime. Police and researchers have developed and tested a variety of prevention options for all six elements. This guide focuses on offenders; specifically, people who have already been convicted of crimes and who are under community supervision ordered by courts or correctional authorities. Although many of these individuals are not actively engaged in offending, the past behavior of people on probation and parole suggests that they have a heightened risk of committing a crime. Consequently, reducing the risks of offending for people on probation and parole can be an ingredient in sustainable solutions to crime problems. In this guide we discuss how offenders are supervised by correctional agencies while on community release. These offenders can cause problems for police (e.g., recidivate and prompt calls for service), so understanding community supervision can be extremely useful for solving such problems. This response guide provides a review of the most effective practices for monitoring offenders on conditional release. For police and their partners, this will help them better understand community supervision, and appreciate the benefits and potential hurdles in their collaborations with community corrections agencies. For probation and parole authorities, this guide may help them develop an understanding of the ways police officers can assist offender supervision and community reintegration.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherCenter for Problem-Oriented Policing, Inc.
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.popcenter.org/responses/monitor_offender_conditional_release/index.cfm
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCorrectional Theory, Offender Treatment and Rehabilitation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160202
dc.titleMonitoring Offenders on Conditional Release
dc.typeBook
dc.type.descriptionA1 - Books
dc.type.codeA - Books
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Center for Problem-Oriented Policing, Inc. The U.S. Department of Justice reserves a royalty-free, nonexclusive, and irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use, and authorize others to use, this publication for Federal Government purposes. This publication may be freely distributed and used for noncommercial and educational purposes
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gro.griffith.authorSchaefer, Lacey


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