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dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Troyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:45:41Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:45:41Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-05T06:04:10Z
dc.identifier.issn13218719en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/pplt.13.2.261en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/14215
dc.description.abstractAn experiment was conducted to investigate ways of increasing the likelihood of an offender confessing. Ninety participants were asked to commit a mock-crime that involved them stealing a wallet. Later the mock-offenders were presented with evidence from a witness who was said to have seen the offence. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions in which they were presented with a witness statement that either contained detailed correct information, not-detailed correct information, or incorrect information. Further, half in each condition were told the witness had identified them, while the other half were told the witness had not identified them. Participants were asked about their likelihood of confessing to the crime, and were asked what had influenced their decision. The results indicate that incorrect information made offenders less likely to confess, while being identified or not, had no impact. The results are discussed in relation to police interviewing techniques.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeBowen Hills, Qlden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13218719.aspen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom261en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto268en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Lawen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380199en_US
dc.titleMock-Suspects' Decisions to Confess: The Influence of Eyewitness Statements and Identifications.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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