Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCote, Isabelle M
dc.contributor.authorDarling, Emily S
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Christopher J
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T03:22:39Z
dc.date.available2018-01-05T03:22:39Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2015.2592
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/142373
dc.description.abstractInteractions between multiple ecosystem stressors are expected to jeopardize biological processes, functions and biodiversity. The scientific community has declared stressor interactions—notably synergies—a key issue for conservation and management. Here, we review ecological literature over the past four decades to evaluate trends in the reporting of ecological interactions (synergies, antagonisms and additive effects) and highlight the implications and importance to conservation. Despite increasing popularity, and ever-finer terminologies, we find that synergies are (still) not the most prevalent type of interaction, and that conservation practitioners need to appreciate and manage for all interaction outcomes, including antagonistic and additive effects. However, it will not be possible to identify the effect of every interaction on every organism's physiology and every ecosystem function because the number of stressors, and their potential interactions, are growing rapidly. Predicting the type of interactions may be possible in the near-future, using meta-analyses, conservation-oriented experiments and adaptive monitoring. Pending a general framework for predicting interactions, conservation management should enact interventions that are robust to uncertainty in interaction type and that continue to bolster biological resilience in a stressful world.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoyal Society Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom20152592-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto20152592-9
dc.relation.ispartofissue1824
dc.relation.ispartofjournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofvolume283
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcosystem Function
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleInteractions among ecosystem stressors and their importance in conservation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBrown, Chris J.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record