Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLiao, Lin-Rong
dc.contributor.authorNg, Gabriel Y. F.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Alice
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Mei-Zhen
dc.contributor.authorPang, Marco Y. C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-12T06:22:54Z
dc.date.available2018-12-12T06:22:54Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/MSS.0000000000000909
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/142441
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A single-blinded randomized controlled study was conducted to investigate the effects of different whole-body vibration (WBV) intensities on body functions/structures, activity, and participation in individuals with stroke. Methods: Eighty-four individuals with chronic stroke (mean age = 61.2 yr,SD = 9.2) with mild to moderate motor impairment (Chedoke–McMaster Stroke Assessment lower limb motor score: median = 9 out of 14, interquartile range = 7–11.8) were randomly assigned to a low-intensity WBV, high-intensity WBV, or control group. The former two groups performed various leg exercises while receiving low-intensity and high-intensity WBV, respectively. Controls performed the same exercises without WBV. All individuals received 30 training sessions over an average period of 75.5 d (SD = 5.2). Outcome measurements included knee muscle strength (isokinetic dynamometry), knee and ankle joint spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), balance (Mini Balance Evaluation Systems Test), mobility (Timed-Up-and-Go test), walking endurance (6-Minute Walk Test), balance self-efficacy (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale), participation in daily activities (Frenchay Activity Index), perceived environmental barriers to societal participation (Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors), and quality of life (Short-Form 12 Health Survey). Assessments were performed at baseline and postintervention. Results: Intention-to-treat analysis revealed a significant time effect for muscle strength, Timed-Up-and-Go distance, and oxygen consumption rate achieved during the 6-Minute Walk Test, the Mini Balance Evaluation Systems Test, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, and the Short-Form 12 Health Survey physical composite score domain (P G 0.05). However, the time–group interaction was not significant for any of the outcome measures (P 9 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of the 30-session WBV paradigm to the leg exercise protocol was no more effective in enhancing body functions/structures, activity, and participation than leg exercises alone in chronic stroke patients with mild to moderate motor impairments.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1227
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1238
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleWhole-Body Vibration Intensities in Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorJones, Alice


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record