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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Sara E
dc.contributor.authorRushton, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-30T01:51:01Z
dc.date.available2018-10-30T01:51:01Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0143-6597
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01436597.2015.1110015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/142650
dc.description.abstractThe UN Security Council meeting on 18 September 2014 represented a major turning-point in the international response to the Ebola outbreak then underway in West Africa. However, in the light of widespread criticism over the tardiness of the international response, it can be argued that the UN, and particularly the Security Council, failed to make best use of a potential resource it already had on the ground in Liberia: the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL). This article examines whether UNMIL could have done more to contribute to the emergency response and attempts to draw some lessons from this experience for potential peacekeeper involvement in future public health emergencies. UNMIL could have done more than it did within the terms of its mandate, although it may well have been hampered by factors such as its own capacities, the views of Troop Contributing Countries and the approach taken by the Liberian government. This case can inform broader discussions over the provision of medical and other forms of humanitarian assistance by peacekeeping missions, such as the danger of politicising humanitarian aid and peacekeepers doing more harm than good. Finally, we warn that a reliance on peacekeepers to deliver health services during ‘normal’ times could foster a dangerous culture of dependency, hampering emergency responses if the need arises.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom319
dc.relation.ispartofpageto435
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThird World Quarterly
dc.relation.ispartofvolume37
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode16
dc.titlePublic health emergencies: a new peacekeeping mission? Insights from UNMIL’s role in the Liberia Ebola outbreak
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Third World Quarterly on 10 Mar 2016, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01436597.2015.1110015
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDavies, Sara E.


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