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dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Mel
dc.contributor.authorJones, Darryl
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T04:27:38Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T04:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1938-5463
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/wsb.631
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/142678
dc.description.abstractReliable identification of individual animals is a primary requirement of population research where data consist of recaptures. Tattooing is a simple and cost‐effective method for permanently marking many mammal species with minimal negative effects, unlike other marking methods, which are often invasive or harmful. Here, we investigate whether a battery‐operated tattoo pen designed for rabbits (Leporidae) is an effective, minimally invasive and low‐cost alternative to other forms of marking and tattooing, which can be successfully applied in the field without altering capture rates. We used the “Rabbi‐tatt” rabbit tattoo pen (Bass Equipment Company, Monnett, MO, USA; http://www.bassequipment.com) to apply identification marks to the ears of northern brown bandicoots (Isoodon macrourus) and common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) captured between January 2013 and May 2015 in conservation reserves near Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Recapture rates did not differ between within‐week recapture rates where tattooing was not used, compared with periods where tattooing was used. During the tattooing period, 50% of possums and 67% of bandicoots were recaptured at least once and many displayed behavior indicative of trap‐happiness after tattooing. The use of the battery‐operated tattoo pen on mammals addresses a number of difficulties associated with tattoo pliers and other forms of permanent marking. We conclude that tattoo pens are a viable method for simply and cost‐effectively marking appropriate species in a minimally invasive way.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherThe Wildlife Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom169
dc.relation.ispartofpageto173
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWildlife Society Bulletin
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.titleTattoo pens as a low-cost approach to in-field permanent identification of medium-sized mammals
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorJones, Darryl N.
gro.griffith.authorMcGregor, Mel


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