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dc.contributor.authorDiedrichs, Phillippa C
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Melissa J
dc.contributor.authorGarbett, Kirsty M
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorHalliwell, Emma
dc.contributor.authorRumsey, Nichola
dc.contributor.authorLeckie, George
dc.contributor.authorSibley, Chris G
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Fiona Kate
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T12:30:34Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T12:30:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/hea0000361
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/142898
dc.description.abstractObjective: Poor body image is a public health issue. Mothers are a key influence on adolescent girls’ body image. This study evaluated an accessible, scalable, low-intensity internet-based intervention delivered to mothers (Dove Self Esteem Project Website for Parents) on mothers’ and their adolescent daughters’ body image and psychosocial well-being. Method: British mother-daughter dyads (N = 235) participated in a cluster randomized controlled trial (assessment-only control; mothers viewed the website without structured guidance [website-unstructured]; mothers viewed the website via a tailored pathway [website-tailored]). Dyads completed standardized self-report measures of body image, related risk factors, and psychosocial outcomes at baseline, 2 weeks post-exposure, 6-week, and 12-month follow-up. Results: Dyadic models showed that relative to the control, mothers who viewed the website reported significantly higher self-esteem at post-exposure (website-tailored), higher weight esteem at 6-week follow-up (website-tailored), lower negative affect at 12-month follow-up (website-tailored), engaged in more self-reported conversations with their daughters about body image at post-exposure and 6-week follow-up, and were 3–4.66 times more likely to report seeking additional support for body image issues at post-exposure (website-tailored), 6-week, and 12-month (website-tailored) follow-up. Daughters whose mothers viewed the website had higher self-esteem and reduced negative affect at 6-week follow-up. There were no differences on daughters’ body image, and risk factors among mothers or daughters, at post-exposure or follow-up. Tailoring website content appeared beneficial. Conclusions: This intervention offers a promising ‘first-step’ toward improving psychosocial well-being among mothers and daughters. In order to further optimize the intervention, future research to improve body image-related outcomes and to understand mechanisms for change would be beneficial.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom996
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1006
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume35
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleRandomized Controlled Trial of an Online Mother-Daughter Body Image and Well-Being Intervention
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 American Psycological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBarlow, Fiona K.


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