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dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Saras
dc.contributor.authorDalton, Megan
dc.contributor.authorCartmel, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-10T06:16:55Z
dc.date.available2018-10-10T06:16:55Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0894-1912en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/CEH.0000000000000093en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143037
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Health professionals may be expert clinicians but do not automatically make effective teachers and need educational development. In response, a team of health academics at an Australian university developed and evaluated the continuing education Graduate Certificate in Health Professional Education Program using an interprofessional learning model. Methods: The model was informed by Collins interactional expertise and Knowles adult learning theories. The team collaboratively developed and taught four courses in the program. Blended learning methods such as web-based learning, face-to-face workshops, and online discussion forums were used. Twenty-seven multidisciplinary participants enrolled in the inaugural program. Focus group interview, self-report questionnaires, and teacher observations were used to evaluate the program. Results: Online learning motivated participants to learn in a collaborative virtual environment. The workshops conducted in an interprofessional environment promoted knowledge sharing and helped participants to better understand other discipline roles, so they could conduct clinical education within a broader health care team context. Work-integrated assessments supported learning relevance. The teachers, however, observed that some participants struggled because of lack of computer skills. Discussion: Although the interprofessional learning model promoted collaboration and flexibility, it is important to note that consideration be given to participants who are not computer literate. We therefore conducted a library and computer literacy workshop in orientation week which helped. An interprofessional learning environment can assist health professionals to operate outside their “traditional silos” leading to a more collaborative approach to the provision of care. Our experience may assist other organizations in developing similar programs.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom211en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto217en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Continuing Education in the Health Professionsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799en_US
dc.titleUsing Interprofessional Learning for Continuing Education: Development and Evaluation of the Graduate Certificate Program in Health Professional Education for Cliniciansen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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