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dc.contributor.authorHerold, David
dc.contributor.authorManwa, Farai
dc.contributor.authorSen, Suman
dc.contributor.authorWilde, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T01:30:50Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T01:30:50Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1176-8592
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143042
dc.description.abstractBeer is a product with a simple core recipe: malt, yeast, hops and water. The transformation of these ingredients in varying proportions and application of varying brewing techniques into alcoholic beverage represents a multi–million dollar beer industry. The entry of craft beers into the industry has further expanded the range of beer styles available in the market. In Australia alone, the beer industry produced more than 18 million hectolitres in 2015, generating more than AUD$4.8 billion in revenue. While the overall consumption of beer in Australia is decreasing, the craft beer industry has achieved double–digit growth rates over the last five years (IBISWorld, 2015). In general, beer is perceived as a sustainable product as the main ingredients are naturally and organically produced (Schaltegger, Viere & Zvezdov, 2012). However, the impressive volume of beer production and consumption in Australia and elsewhere comes at a cost. It employs a brewing process that is very water and energy–intensive, thereby leaving a relatively large carbon footprint on the environment through contamination of nearby soil and water bodies, and emission of anthropogenic gases in the air (Fish, 2015). From an academic perspective, very limited research on sustainability in entrepreneurial craft breweries has been undertaken and is mostly US–centric. As far as the authors are aware, no other study has been undertaken to date that explores sustainability practices in craft breweries in Australia. This paper explores sustainability activities in the craft beer industry using a qualitative research approach based on secondary data and examines current practices to improve the environmental sustainability performance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRossiSmith Academic Publications
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.asiaentrepreneurshipjournal.com/
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom82
dc.relation.ispartofpageto110
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Asia Entrepreneurship and Sustainability
dc.relation.ispartofvolumeXII
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSmall Business Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommerce, Management, Tourism and Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150314
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode15
dc.titleIt's the yeast we can do: Untapping Sustainability Trends in Australian Craft Breweries
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studies
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Journal of Asia Entrepreneurship and Sustainability published by RossiSmith Academic Publications. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHerold, David M.


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