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dc.contributor.authorSammel, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-22T04:19:08Z
dc.date.available2019-03-22T04:19:08Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0016-7185en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geoforum.2016.09.015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143049
dc.description.abstractThe existence of freshwater is fundamental to all life on the planet. Water and society constantly shape and reshape each other. Historically and contemporarily, freshwater exists in dialectical relationship with societies. Despite this, most people seem to have an inadequate understanding of water. To explore this problem, this paper investigates how the concept of ‘water’ is constructed through the discursive practice of formal education in Queensland, Australia and Saskatchewan, Canada. A review of formal education curricula was chosen because schooling integrates students into a knowledge community focused on defined social and cultural knowledge. In other words, formal education shapes how individuals, communities and societies make sense of water. This analysis shows that water is constructed as a predominantly nature-based phenomenon and offered decontextualized. Understandings of extreme water events are virtually non-existent. This paper concludes with recommendations for future curriculum development, specifically ensuring that what is taught and how it is taught directly relates to the lives of the students and their community.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom164en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto175en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeoforumen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume76en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.subject.keywordsWateren_US
dc.subject.keywordsExtreme water eventsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsWater educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHydrosocial cycleen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCurriculum-water education interfaceen_US
dc.titleHer beauty and her terror: A case study exploring the framing of water and extreme water events within formal education in Queensland, Australia and Saskatchewan, Canadaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSammel, Alison J.


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