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dc.contributor.authorSnow, Peter J
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T04:49:58Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T04:49:58Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2016.00501
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143144
dc.description.abstractThis article proposes that what have been historically and contemporarily defined as different domains of human cognition are served by one of four functionally- and structurally-distinct areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Their contributions to human intelligence are as follows: (a) BA9, enables our emotional intelligence, engaging the psychosocial domain; (b) BA47, enables our practical intelligence, engaging the material domain; (c) BA46 (or BA46-9/46), enables our abstract intelligence, engaging the hypothetical domain; and (d) BA10, enables our temporal intelligence, engaging in planning within any of the other three domains. Given their unique contribution to human cognition, it is proposed that these areas be called the, social (BA9), material (BA47), abstract (BA46-9/46) and temporal (BA10) mind. The evidence that BA47 participates strongly in verbal and gestural communication suggests that language evolved primarily as a consequence of the extreme selective pressure for practicality; an observation supported by the functional connectivity between BA47 and orbital areas that negatively reinforce lying. It is further proposed that the abstract mind (BA46-9/46) is the primary seat of metacognition charged with creating adaptive behavioral strategies by generating higher-order concepts (hypotheses) from lower-order concepts originating from the other three domains of cognition.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom501-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto501-24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleThe Structural and Functional Organization of Cognition
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Science
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Snow. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSnow, Peter J.


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