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dc.contributor.authorKisely, Steve
dc.contributor.authorWyder, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Josie
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Gail
dc.contributor.authorSiskind, Dan
dc.contributor.authorCrompton, David
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-04T01:18:28Z
dc.date.available2018-01-04T01:18:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1445-8330
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/inm.12261
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143188
dc.description.abstractImproving the input of people with mental illness into their recovery plans can potentially lead to better outcomes. In the present study, we evaluated the introduction of motivational aftercare planning (MAP) into the discharge planning of psychiatric inpatients. MAP is a manualized intervention combining motivational interviewing with advance directives. We measured changes in the level of patient input into discharge planning following training staff in the use of MAP. This included the following: (i) documentation of early relapse signs along with successful past responses; (ii) evidence of aftercare planning; and (iii) the use of the patients' own words in the plan. We used a ward-level controlled before-and-after design comparing one intervention ward with two control wards. We used anonymized recovery plans, with a goal of 50 plans per ward before and after the intervention, to look for evidence of patient input into care planning with a standardized checklist. There were also qualitative interviews with individuals discharged from the unit. We reviewed 100 intervention ward plans and 197 control ones (total n = 297). There were no significant differences in recovery plans from intervention and control wards at baseline. Following MAP training, the intervention ward improved significantly (e.g. identification of triggers increased from 52 to 94%, χ2 = 23.3, d.f. =1, P < 0.001). This did not occur in the control wards. The qualitative data (n = 20 interviews) showed improvements in participants' experiences of discharge planning. MAP increased inpatient input into discharge planning and was valued by participants. The effect on subsequent health service use needs evaluation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleMotivational aftercare planning to better care: Applying the principles of advanced directives and motivational interviewing to discharge planning for people with mental illness
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Menzies Health Institute
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKisely, Steve R.
gro.griffith.authorRobinson, Pamela G.
gro.griffith.authorCrompton, David R.
gro.griffith.authorWyder, Marianne


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