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dc.contributor.authorTrevaskes, Sue
dc.contributor.authorNesossi, Elisa
dc.contributor.editorG. Davies, J. Goldkorn and L. Tomba
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T03:56:16Z
dc.date.available2018-03-20T03:56:16Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781760460693
dc.identifier.doi10.22459/CSY.09.2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/143200
dc.description.abstractTo understand what the rule of law actually means, we need to look closely at the October 2014 Resolution, because it states that Party leadership and the rule of law are identical. It also describes the rule of law as integrating two ancient traditions of law and governance: the Legalist tradition of ‘ruling the nation according to the law’ with the Confucian principle of ‘ruling the nation by morality’ 以德治国. The latter associates political order with the moral authority of a nation’s leaders. The interests of a morally upright leadership are identical to those of the people they govern—and so, by this logic, the law can and should be used to sustain the power of the ruling (Communist) party. Hence, the rule of law can be understood to mean Party-Rule-Through-Law.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitlePollution: China Story Yearbook 2015
dc.relation.ispartofchapter2
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom64
dc.relation.ispartofpageto93
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.titleThe Fog of Law
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Languages and Linguistics
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorTrevaskes, Sue E.


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