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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHillyer, Miaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:06:57Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:06:57Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-09-24T05:52:42Z
dc.identifier.issn00221112en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.0022-1112.2006.01073.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/14464
dc.description.abstractThis study used allozymes and mtDNA variation to test that: 1) populations of two fish species, Nematolosa erebi and Retropinna semoni, in lowland rivers in central Australia were highly connected within drainages, 2) populations in different drainages were highly differentiated and 3) there was evidence of historical connections between two major lowland drainages in inland Australia. Levels of genetic differentiation among populations within drainages were low, but still statistically significant, indicating that populations were not as highly connected as had been predicted. Populations from the Murray-Darling and the Lake Eyre drainages were highly differentiated, indicating no contemporary dispersal across drainage boundaries. Both species showed evidence of historical connections between the two drainage basins, although estimates of the time that these last occurred differed between the two species. Nematolosa erebi populations from the two drainages were estimated to have been separated c. 150 000 years ago, whereas populations of R. semoni, were estimated to have been separated c. 1.5 million years ago.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeOxford, Englanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118483233/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom270en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto291en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionSupplement Ben_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Fish Biologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume68en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode270709en_US
dc.titleMitochondrial DNA and allozymes reveal high dispersal abilities and historical movement across drainage boundaries in two species of freshwater fishes from inland rivers in Queensland, Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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