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dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorHiller, D.en_US
dc.contributor.editorHoppeler H., Reilly T., Tsolakidis E., Gfeller L., Klossner S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:11:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:11:35Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2007-09-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/14581
dc.description.abstractDespite its legality, caffeine remains on WADA's monitoring program, which results in the drug be placed under heightened scrutiny for further tracking of trends in use and possible abuse for future prohibition list consideration1. This study assessed the knowledge and prevalence of caffeine use by athletes completing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships. Caffeine-related questionnaires were administered to 140 (105 male and 35 female, 40.3ᱰ.7 years) athletes (8% of all participants) from 16 countries throughout race registration. 50 of these athletes further consented to immediate post-race blood samples for analysis of plasma caffeine and paraxanthine using HPLC. 100 (71%) athletes correctly identified caffeine as being unrestricted in triathlon. Only 15 (11%) athletes were not planning on using a caffeinated substance immediately prior to or throughout the race. Cola (78%), Caffeinated Gels (42%), Coffee (usually pre-race) (37%), Energy Drinks (13%), and No Doz Tablets (9%) were the most popular caffeinated choices. More than half the athletes (52%) stated that they did not know an optimal caffeine dose for their sport. The most common sources for information on caffeine were reported as self researched/experimentation (44%), fellow athletes (42%), magazines (38%) and journal articles (33%). Meanᓄ (and range) post race plasma caffeine and paraxanthine levels were 22.3Ჰ 孯l/L (1.7-98.4) and 9.4ᶠ孯l/L (1.8-28.9) respectively. Seven athletes (14%) finished with plasma caffeine levels =40 ?mol/L. Plasma values from elite athletes did not differ from age group competitiors. Caffeine is popularly targeted as a potential ergogenic aid by endurance triathletes. Surprisingly, despite the prevalence of its consumption and the training experience of this athletic group many participants remained either confused or misinformed of its legality. Levels of plasma caffeine and paraxanthine taken immediately post race indicate that athletes completing in ironman races often finish the race with quantities of caffeine that have been shown to improve endurance performance (i.e. 蠲0孯l/L or a dose of ? 3 mg/kg bw). Average paraxanthine levels would indicate that the initiation of caffeine ingestion was typically =3-4 hrs prior to race completion. The widespread use of caffeine by ironman athletes appears largely the result of self research and peer experimentation rather than by consultation with qualified professionals.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent101059 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSportverlag Straussen_US
dc.publisher.placeCologneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ecss2006.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename11th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle11th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science. Book of Abstractsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2006-07-05en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2006-07-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationLausanne, Switzerlanden_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321499en_US
dc.titleAwareness and Use of Caffeine by Athletes Competing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships.en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Healthen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2006 European College of Sports Science. Use hypertext link to access the publisher's website.en_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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