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dc.contributor.authorM. Hobson, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharman, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:53:27Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:53:27Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-20T22:10:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1354-0661en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1354066105050137en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/15390
dc.description.abstractConventional wisdom maintains that since 1648 the international system has comprised states-as-like units endowed with Westphalian sovereignty under anarchy. And while radical globalization theorists certainly dispute the centrality of the state in modern world politics, nevertheless most assume that the state retains its sovereignty under globalization. In contrast we argue that hierarchical sub-systems (and hence unlike units) have been common since 1648, and that the international system continues to be characterized by hierarchical (as well as anarchic) relations. The article goes on to reveal the existence of these multiple hierarchic formations and uncovers the differing social logics connected with identity-formation processes that govern their reproduction. Successive religious, racial, socialist and democratic social logics not only constitute their reproduction, but the emergence of new norms, social ideas and identities have to an important extent accounted for the rise and decay of successive hierarchies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://ejt.sagepub.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom63en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto98en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of International Relationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360100en_US
dc.titleThe Enduring Place of Hierarchy in World Politics: Tracing the Social Logics of Hierarchy and Political Changeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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