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dc.contributor.convenorG Murrayen_AU
dc.contributor.authorPeetz, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.editorGregor Murray, Colette Bernier, Denis Harrison, Terry H. Wagaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:32:30Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-23T05:21:55Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/1563
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade or more, employer use of individual contracts to determine pay and conditions for employees increased in Australia and elsewhere, in no small part due to encouragement by governments, including through legislation promoting Australian Workplace Agreements (AWAs). This paper considers the evidence on the impact of individual contacts and collective bargaining on outcomes such as pay and conditions for employees and the implications for the distribution of power. Employees on AWAs receive higher pay on average than other employees, due to the overrepresentation of managerial and senior specialised skilled staff amongst AWA employees. For other employees, however, individual contracts appear to be more likely to be associated with lower wage increases and/or a reduction in other conditions of employment. This in turn reflects the impact that individual contracting, compared to collective bargaining, has on the power of employees. Collective bargaining increases the bargaining power of employees, is the mechanism by which unions achieve most gains for their members, and is strengthened when union density is high. However, not all employees receive lower wages if they shift from collective bargaining to AWAs: some receive a non-union premium, by which employers in effect purchase a transfer of power from employees. While the impact of individual contracting, by comparison with collective bargaining, on pay and conditions may vary, it is unambiguously associated with a transfer of power from employees to employers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent186531 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanadian Industrial Relations Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeQuebecen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.cira-acri.ca/en/about/index.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameXXXVIIIth Annual CIRA Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleRethinking Institutions for Work and Employmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2001-05-26en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2001-05-28en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationQuebecen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350203en_US
dc.titleIndividual Contracts, Collective Bargaining, Wages and Power : An Australian Analysisen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2002. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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