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dc.contributor.authorAllan, Cameronen_US
dc.contributor.editorBramble T. et alen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:49:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:49:05Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.date.modified2007-11-14T01:03:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/15904
dc.description.abstractThe labour flexibility literature has been largely organised around two central forms of labour utilisation: numerical flexibility and functional flexibility. The former denotes the use of a range of different employment forms and working-time arrangements to more accurately adjust labour-use to demand patterns. The latter refers to the expansion of worker autonomy and mobility to allow rapid movement between work tasks. The concepts of numerical and functional flexibility have often been used as defining characteristics of different labour management strategies. However, work is characterised not just by the range and nature of tasks undertaken (functional flexibility) and its quantum (numerical flexibility), but also by its intensity (work effort). Employers can and do adjust effort levels independently of functional and numerical adjustments. Work intensification needs to be recognised as an entirely separate labour adjustment process.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent61992 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAiraanzen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.airaanz.org/1997-conference-main.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameCurrent Research in Industrial Relationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleCurrent Research in Industrial Relationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom1997-01-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto1997-01-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbaneen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350203en_US
dc.titleWork intensification: A Lacuna in the labour utilisation literatureen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conference Publications (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 1997 Association of Industrial Relations Academics Australia & New Zealand (AIRAANZ). The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.en_AU
gro.date.issued1997
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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