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dc.contributor.convenorSchool Social Sciences, ANUen_AU
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Giorelen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Acker, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHollander, Robynen_US
dc.contributor.editorAPSAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:07:53Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:07:53Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.modified2008-05-26T02:07:44Z
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.auspsa.org.au/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/1606
dc.description.abstractThe rise and fall of Pauline Hanson and her One Nation party remains a fascinating episode in recent Australian political history. Australia's flirtation with this example of far right populism lasted less than a decade. Elsewhere far right populist political parties have proved to be far more successful and enduring. This paper is interested in why Australia's One Nation Party withered while European far right counterparts thrive. The paper thus focuses on recent developments in France, the Netherlands and Austria in looking for clues to explain the Australian experience. While the far right populist experience in these European countries and in Australia has much in common including a strong anti-immigrant stance, there are also elements that are significantly different. This comparative research focuses on three key areas. First, it investigates the degree to which a particular country's electoral method contributes to both the emergence and endurance of their populist parties. Second, clues to explain endurance are sought in comparisons of party dynamics. Finally, the contribution that the incorporation of populist policies into the platforms of mainstream parties is also explored. Overall, what this research shows is that there are no simple explanations for the rise of these parties and we need to avoid crude generalisations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent147104 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAPSAen_US
dc.publisher.placeANU, Canberraen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://arts.anu.edu.au/sss/apsa/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAPSA 50en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralasian Political Studies Association (APSA) 2002en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2002-10-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2002-10-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationANU Canberraen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360102en_US
dc.titleXenophobia: is it enough? Far right populist parties in Australia and Europeen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2002. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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