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dc.contributor.authorStanisic, DI
dc.contributor.authorFowkes, FJI
dc.contributor.authorKoinari, M
dc.contributor.authorJavati, S
dc.contributor.authorLin, E
dc.contributor.authorKiniboro, B
dc.contributor.authorRichards, JS
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, LJ
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, L
dc.contributor.authorKazura, JW
dc.contributor.authorKing, CL
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, P
dc.contributor.authorFelger, I
dc.contributor.authorSiba, PM
dc.contributor.authorMueller, I
dc.contributor.authorBeeson, JG
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T12:31:44Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T12:31:44Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0019-9567
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/IAI.02398-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/166004
dc.description.abstractIndividuals in areas of Plasmodium falciparum endemicity develop immunity to malaria after repeated exposure. Knowledge of the acquisition and nature of protective immune responses to P. falciparum is presently limited, particularly for young children. We examined antibodies (IgM, IgG, and IgG subclasses) to merozoite antigens and their relationship to the prospective risk of malaria in children 1 to 4 years of age in a region of malaria endemicity in Papua New Guinea. IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 responses generally increased with age, were higher in children with active infection, and reflected geographic heterogeneity in malaria transmission. Antigenic properties, rather than host factors, appeared to be the main determinant of the type of IgG subclass produced. High antibody levels were not associated with protection from malaria; in contrast, they were typically associated with an increased risk of malaria. Adjustment for malaria exposure, using a novel molecular measure of the force of infection by P. falciparum, accounted for much of the increased risk, suggesting that the antibodies were markers of higher exposure to P. falciparum. Comparisons between antibodies in this cohort of young children and in a longitudinal cohort of older children suggested that the lack of protective association was explained by lower antibody levels among young children and that there is a threshold level of antibodies required for protection from malaria. Our results suggest that in populations with low immunity, such as young children, antibodies to merozoite antigens may act as biomarkers of malaria exposure and that, with increasing exposure and responses of higher magnitude, antibodies may act as biomarkers of protective immunity.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom646
dc.relation.ispartofpageto660
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInfection and Immunity
dc.relation.ispartofvolume83
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Parasitology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110803
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleAcquisition of antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and malaria immunity in young children and the influence of age, force of infection, and magnitude of response
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyOffice of the Snr Dep Vice Chancellor, Institute for Glycomics
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 American Society for Microbiology. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStanisic, Danielle


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