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dc.contributor.authorAllard, Troyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWortley, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Annaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:14:56Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:14:56Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.date.modified2009-09-01T05:59:40Z
dc.identifier.issn1068316Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1068316031000093414en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/16601
dc.description.abstractA study was conducted to determine whether prior research had accurately conceptualised community correctional officers' experience of role conflict on the basis of officers' role preferences. It was hypothesised that officers who were welfare workers or punitive officers would experience inter-role conflict while those who attempted to combine the welfare and punitive roles (protective agents) would experience intra-role conflict and role ambiguity. Furthermore, an exploration of how inter-role conflict, intra-role conflict, role ambiguity, and officers' role preferences were related to occupational burnout was conducted. It was found in this study that officers' preferences for the role of welfare worker, protective agent, or punitive officer were not related to the level of inter-role conflict, intra-role conflict, or role ambiguity experienced by officers. Officers' role preferences were not related to burnout. Inter-role conflict and intra-role conflict were associated with emotional exhaustion. These findings call into question the whole tradition in the community corrections literature of inferring role conflict from officers' role preferences and necessitate that the whole issue of whether officers experience role conflict be revisited by employing direct measures of role conflict.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent114930 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t713647155en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom279en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto289en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology, Crime & Lawen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode399999en_US
dc.titleRole Conflict in Community Correctionsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2003 Routlege.This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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