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dc.contributor.authorBertolote, Joseen_US
dc.contributor.authorFleischmann, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorBolhari, Jafaren_US
dc.contributor.authorBotega, Neuryen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Silva, Damanien_US
dc.contributor.authorThi Huong, Huong Tranen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchlebusch, Lourensen_US
dc.contributor.authorVarnik, Airien_US
dc.contributor.authorVijayakumar, Lakshmien_US
dc.contributor.authorWasserman, Danutaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:39:12Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:39:12Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-09-08T04:57:18Z
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291705005404en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/16663
dc.description.abstractBackground. The objectives were to assess thoughts about suicide, plans to commit suicide and suicide attempts in the community, to investigate the use of health services following a suicide attempt, and to describe basic socio-cultural indices of the community. Method. The community survey was one component of the larger WHO multisite intervention study on suicidal behaviours (SUPRE-MISS). In each site, it aimed at randomly selecting and interviewing at least 500 subjects of the general population living in the catchment area of the emergency department where the intervention component of the study was conducted. Communities of eight SUPRE-MISS sites (in Brazil, China, Estonia, India, Iran, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam) participated plus two additional sites from Australia and Sweden conducting similar surveys. Results. Suicide attempts (0紭4粥), plans (1籭15綥), and ideation (2維25紥) varied by a factor of 10-14 across sites, but remained mostly within the ranges of previously published data. Depending on the site, the ratios between attempts, plans, and thoughts of suicide differed substantially. Medical attention following a suicide attempt varied between 22% and 88% of the attempts. Conclusions. The idea of the suicidal process as a continuous and smooth evolution from thoughts to plans and attempts of suicide needs to be further investigated as it seems to be dependent on the cultural setting. There are indications, that the burden of undetected attempted suicide is high in different cultures; an improved response from the health sector on how to identify and support these individuals is needed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent128428 bytes
dc.format.extent36772 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1457en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1465en_US
dc.relation.ispartofedition2005en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume35en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321206en_US
dc.titleSuicide attempts, plans, and ideation in culturally diverse sites: the WHO SUPRE-MISS community surveyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2005 Cambridge University Press. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.en_AU
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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