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dc.contributor.authorBisset, Leanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeller, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorJull, Gwendolenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorDarnell, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorVicenzino, Billen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:39:13Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:39:13Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2008-02-21T06:22:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0959535Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/16918
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the efficacy of physiotherapy compared to both a wait and see approach and corticosteroid injections over 52 weeks in tennis elbow. Design: Single blind randomised controlled trial Setting: Community setting, Brisbane, Australia Participants: 198 participants aged 18 to 65 years with a clinical diagnosis of tennis elbow of a minimum six weeks duration, who had not received any other active treatment by a health practitioner in the previous six months. Interventions: Eight sessions of physiotherapy versus corticosteroid injections or wait and see. Main outcome measures: Global improvement, grip force and assessor's rating of severity measured at baseline, 6 and 52 weeks. Results: Corticosteroid injection showed significantly superior effects at six weeks, but with high recurrence rates thereafter (47/65 of successes subsequently regressed), and significantly poorer outcomes in the long term when compared with physiotherapy. Physiotherapy was superior to wait and see in the short term; no difference was seen at 52 weeks, when most participants in both groups reported a successful outcome. Participants who had physiotherapy sought less additional treatment, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, than did participants who had wait and see or injections. Conclusion: Physiotherapy combining elbow manipulation and exercise has a superior benefit to wait and see in the first six weeks and to corticosteroid injections after six weeks, providing a reasonable alternative to injections in the to mid to long term. The significant short term benefits of corticosteroid injection are paradoxically reversed after six weeks with high recurrence rates, implying that this treatment should be used with caution in the management of tennis elbow.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent270475 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBMJ Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondon Englanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://bjsm.bmj.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom939en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto941en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Medical Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume333en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode329903en_US
dc.titleMobilisation with movement and exercise, corticosteroid injection, or wait and see for tennis elbow: randomised trialen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author's 2006. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author's. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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