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dc.contributor.authorSnow, KJ
dc.contributor.authorYoung, JT
dc.contributor.authorPreen, DB
dc.contributor.authorLennox, NG
dc.contributor.authorKinner, SA
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T00:15:08Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T00:15:08Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-14-830
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171813
dc.description.abstractBackground Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among prisoners, particularly those with a history of injecting drug use (IDU). Incarcerated people who inject drugs frequently report high-risk injecting practices both in prison and in the community. In spite of rising morbidity and mortality, utilisation of HCV-related services in Australia has been persistently low. This study aimed to describe the incidence, prevalence and correlates of HCV seropositivity in a large cohort of prisoners who have injected drugs, and to identify correlates of receiving confirmation of active infection. Methods Data-linkage to a State-wide statutory notifiable diseases surveillance system was used to investigate the incidence of notified HCV seropositivity, seroconversion and confirmed HCV infection in a cohort of 735 prisoners with a history of IDU, over 14 years of follow up. Hepatitis C test results from prison medical records were used to identify correlates of testing positive in prison. Results The crude incidence of HCV notification was 5.1 cases per 100 person-years. By the end of follow up, 55.1% of the cohort had been the subject of a HCV-related notification, and 47.4% of those tested in prison were HCV seropositive. In multivariable analyses, injecting in prison was strongly associated with HCV seropositivity, as was opioid use compared to injection of other drugs. The rate of reported diagnostic confirmation among those with notified infections was very low, at 6.6 confirmations per 100 seropositive participants per year. Conclusions Injecting drugs in prison was strongly associated with HCV seropositivity, highlighting the need for increased provision of services to mitigate the risk of transmission within prisons. Once identified as seropositive through screening, people with a history of IDU and incarceration may not be promptly receiving diagnostic services, which are necessary if they are to access treatment. Improving access to HCV-related services will be of particular importance in the coming years, as HCV-related morbidity and mortality is increasing, and next generation therapies are becoming more widely available.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.place10.1186/1471-2458-14-830
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom830-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto830-7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCorrectional Theory, Offender Treatment and Rehabilitation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleIncidence and correlates of hepatitis C virus infection in a large cohort of prisoners who have injected drugs
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© Snow et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKinner, Stuart A.


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