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dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, Nikos LD
dc.contributor.authorBarkoukis, Vassilis
dc.contributor.authorYli-Piipari, Sami
dc.contributor.authorThogersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
dc.contributor.authorNtoumanis, Nikos
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T23:46:19Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T23:46:19Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2015.07.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171857
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study examined whether individuals who assigned equal priority to physical activity and an alternative activity exhibited lower levels of participation in physical activities than individuals who assigned higher priority to physical activity than an alternative activity. In addition, we examined whether a measure of prioritisation derived from an algebraic difference index provided a rigorous test of prioritisation effects. Design: We employed a two-wave prospective design that aimed to predict physical activity participation. Method: Prioritisation, intentions and perceptions of control were measured at the first wave of data collection. After five weeks, we administered follow-up measures of behavioural conflict and physical activity participation. Results: A hierarchical regression analysis showed that although the algebraic difference index was positively associated with measures of physical activity participation, equal prioritisation did not yield lower levels of physical activity participation than high prioritisation. Conclusions: Findings suggest that equal prioritisation is not a less optimal self-regulatory strategy than high prioritisation in the domain of physical activity. Regression coefficients associated with algebraic difference indexes should be interpreted with caution and consider analyses that examine effects of component measures of prioritisation on physical activity participation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom123
dc.relation.ispartofpageto130
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleEqual prioritisation does not yield lower levels of participation in physical activities than higher prioritisation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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