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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Graeme
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T06:23:39Z
dc.date.available2019-03-18T06:23:39Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2169-2793en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1946756716673640en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171865
dc.description.abstractAt this time, most climate researchers are only using a limited range of futures approaches: for example, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) future scenarios have been developed primarily with empirical predictive methods that extrapolate trends. These seriously underestimate the risk of nonlinear developments and critical failures. This article examines the Paris Climate Conference (COP) 21 agreement on climate mitigation; explains why current efforts are based on false assumptions and likely to fail; argues that holistic, integrative methods are needed to avoid disaster; and uses these methods to develop a practical strategy for accelerating systemic transformation. Despite the impressive diplomatic achievements of the Paris Agreement, there is a dangerous lag between the pace of political, economic, and technological change and the rapid (nonnegotiable) rate of climate change. The challenge is to find ways to manage the conflict between the need to work within existing institutional frameworks and the reality that they are not (and may be structurally incapable of) acting quickly enough to prevent catastrophic outcomes. This dichotomy may be resolved by using a three-track strategy: the first track will focus on accelerating existing climate mitigation efforts by encouraging decision-makers to use holistic, critical-safety risk management methods. The second track will counter ideological opposition with constructive alternative narratives. The third track will help catalyze the global movement needed to empower structural transformation and the emergence of a sustainable global system. It will not be possible to resolve many complex global socioecological problems (climate, water, food, energy, growing inequality, etc.) without transformational change. Integrative, whole-systems methods are now needed to accelerate the evolution of a sustainable global system.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Incen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom141en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto161en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWorld Future Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Politicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Changeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050205en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160605en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160805en_US
dc.titleA realistic (holistic) approach to climate mitigationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorTaylor, Graeme


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