Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCaudwell, Kim M
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T03:10:40Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T03:10:40Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1758-0846
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aphw.12044
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171877
dc.description.abstractBackground: The aim of the present study was to examine the social-cognitive and motivational factors associated with pre-drinking based on a model integrating motivational constructs from self-determination theory and belief-based constructs from the theory of planned behaviour. Methods: A prospective correlational design was used. Participants (N = 286; 66.4% female) completed self-report measures of past alcohol consumption, autonomous and controlled forms of motivation from self-determination theory, and attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and behavioural intentions from the theory of planned behaviour at baseline. Participants reported pre-drinking frequency four weeks later. Results: Variance-based structural equation modelling showed that the hypothesised model predicted 54 per cent of the variance in pre-drinking intentions at baseline, and 20 per cent of the variance in pre-drinking behaviour at follow-up. Mediation analyses indicated strong, statistically significant effects of autonomous motivation on intentions to pre-drink, partially mediated by attitudes and subjective norms. Intention and perceived behavioural control significantly predicted pre-drinking frequency. Conclusions: Results provide support for the hypothesised model relationships. Autonomous motivation, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control were influential in forming students’ intentions to pre-drink. However, consistent with previous findings, the intention–behaviour relationship was relatively weak. Future research should look to non-intentional and volitional processes that may influence pre-drinking in undergraduates.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom188
dc.relation.ispartofpageto213
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalApplied Psychology: Health and Well-Being
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titlePredicting Alcohol Pre-Drinking in Australian Undergraduate Students Using an Integrated Theoretical Model
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 International Association of Applied Psychology. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Predicting Alcohol Pre-Drinking in Australian Undergraduate Students Using an Integrated Theoretical Model, Applied Psychology, Volume 7, Issue 2, July 2015, Pages 188–213, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/aphw.12044. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record