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dc.contributor.authorChan, Derwin KC
dc.contributor.authorLentillon-Kaestner, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorDimmock, James A
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Robert J
dc.contributor.authorKeatley, David A
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sarah J
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T22:30:25Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T22:30:25Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/jsep.2014-0250
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171881
dc.description.abstractWe applied the strength-energy model of self-control to understand the relationship between self-control and young athletes’ behavioral responses to taking illegal performance-enhancing substances, or “doping.” Measures of trait self-control, attitude and intention toward doping, intention toward, and adherence to, doping-avoidant behaviors, and the prevention of unintended doping behaviors were administered to 410 young Australian athletes. Participants also completed a “lollipop” decision-making protocol that simulated avoidance of unintended doping. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses revealed that self-control was negatively associated with doping attitude and intention, and positively associated with the intention and adherence to doping-avoidant behaviors, and refusal to take or eat the unfamiliar candy offered in the “lollipop” protocol. Consistent with the strength-energy model, athletes with low self-control were more likely to have heightened attitude and intention toward doping, and reduced intention, behavioral adherence, and awareness of doping avoidance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom199
dc.relation.ispartofpageto206
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume37
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleSelf-control, self-regulation, and doping in sport: A test of the strength-energy model
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Human Kinetics. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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