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dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.contributor.authorKeatley, David A
dc.contributor.authorChan, Derwin CK
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, Nikos LD
dc.contributor.authorDimmock, James A
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Ben
dc.contributor.authorNtoumanis, Nikos
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T01:43:16Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T01:43:16Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-013-9317-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171910
dc.description.abstractWhile we agree that personal financial incentives (PFIs) may have some utility in public health interventions to motivate people in the uptake and persistence of health behaviour, we disagree with some of the sentiments outlined by Lynagh et al. (Int J Behav Med 20:114–120, 2012). Specifically, we feel that the article gives a much stronger impression that PFIs will likely lead to long-term behaviour change once the incentive has been removed than is warranted by current research. This claim has not received strong empirical support nor is it grounded in psychological theory on the role of incentives and motivation. We also feel that the presentation of some of the tenets of self-determination theory by the authors is misleading. Based on self-determination theory, we propose that PFIs, without sufficient consideration of the mechanisms by which external incentives affect motivation and the interpersonal context in which they are presented, are unlikely to lead to persistence in health behaviour once the incentive is removed. We argue that interventions that adopt PFIs as a strategy to promote health-behaviour change should incorporate strategies in the interpersonal context to minimise the undermining effect of the incentives on intrinsic motivation. Interventions should present incentives as informational regarding individuals’ competence rather than as purely contingent on behavioural engagement and emphasise self-determined reasons for pursuing the behaviour.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom197
dc.relation.ispartofpageto201
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleThe goose is (half) cooked: A consideration of the mechanisms and interpersonal context is needed to elucidate the effects of personal financial incentives on health behaviour
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Springer US. This is an electronic version of an article published in International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, February 2014, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 197–201. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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