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dc.contributor.authorJoesaar, Helen
dc.contributor.authorHein, Vello
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-16T22:50:23Z
dc.date.available2017-11-16T22:50:23Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2011.12.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171941
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985) and achievement goal theory (AGT; Nicholls, 1989), the present study examined the temporal stability and reciprocal relationships among three key variables related to motivation: perceived autonomy support from the coach, task-involving peer motivational climates, and athletes’ intrinsic motivation. Design: A prospective longitudinal design with data collected on two occasions one year apart over the course of a youth training season. Method: Young athletes (N = 362, age range 11–16 years) completed measures of the Sport Climate Questionnaire and the Peer Motivational Climate in Youth Sport Questionnaire. One-year later participants completed these questionnaires again along with the Sport Motivation Scale. Results: Structural equation modeling indicated that perceived autonomy support from the coach and task-involving peer motivational climates exhibited comparatively high stability over a one-year period. In cross-lagged analyses, perceived autonomy support from the coach positively predicted task-involving peer climate one-year later but not vice versa. In addition, both social factors demonstrated a significant direct effect on athletes intrinsic motivation measured concurrently in sport contexts. Further, an alternative structural model supported a longitudinal direct effect of autonomy support from the coach and task-involving peer climate measured on the first occasion on subsequent intrinsic motivation. Conclusion: Results demonstrated the value of perceived autonomy support from the coach and task-involving peer motivational climate in predicting athletes’ intrinsic motivation over a training year. Findings also suggest that perceived autonomy support from the coach can facilitate later task-involving peer motivational climate.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom257
dc.relation.ispartofpageto262
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleYouth athletes' perception of autonomy support from the coach, peer motivational climate and intrinsic motivation in sport setting: One-year effects
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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