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dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Nele
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.contributor.authorStreukens, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
dc.contributor.authorClaes, Neree
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-28T04:57:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T04:57:21Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1359-107X
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/135910710X519305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171952
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The aim of the study was to test the relations between constructs from the self-determination theory (autonomous and controlled motivation), the theory of planned behaviour (attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions), and behaviour change within a theoretically integrated model. Additionally, the aim was to test if these relations vary by behaviour (physical activity or dietary behaviour) or intervention intensity (frequency). Design: It was a randomized controlled trial with a ‘usual care’ condition (medical screening only) and an intervention condition (medical screening+access to a website and coaching). Participants in the latter condition could freely determine their own intervention intensity. Methods: Participants (N= 287) completed measures of the theoretical constructs and behaviour at baseline and after the first intervention year (N= 236). Partial least squares path modelling was used. Results: Changes in autonomous motivation positively predicted changes in self-efficacy and intentions towards a healthy diet. Changes in controlled motivation positively predicted changes in attitudes towards physical activity, changes in self-efficacy, and changes in behavioural intentions. The intervention intensity moderated the effect of self-efficacy on intentions towards physical activity and the relationship between attitude and physical activity. Changes in physical activity were positively predicted by changes in intentions whereas desired changes in fat intake were negatively predicted by the intervention intensity. Conclusions: Important relations within the theoretically integrated model were confirmed but others were not. Moderation effects were found for behaviour and intervention intensity.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom113
dc.relation.ispartofpageto134
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleTesting an integrated model of the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory for different energy balance-related behaviours and intervention intensities
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 British Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Testing an integrated model of the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory for different energy balance-related behaviours and intervention intensities, British Journal of Health Psychology, Vol 16(1) pp. 113-134, 2011, which has been published in final form at 10.1348/135910710X519305. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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