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dc.contributor.authorAllom, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorPanetta, Giulia
dc.contributor.authorMullan, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-13T01:59:34Z
dc.date.available2017-11-13T01:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0191-8869
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2015.10.051
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/171959
dc.description.abstractThe capacity for self-control has been consistently linked to successful execution of health behaviour. However, a lack of consensus remains in the conceptualisation and measurement of the construct. Notably, self-report measures relate to behavioural measures of self-control only weakly or not at all. The aim of the current research was to examine the relationship between self-report and behavioural measures of self-control to determine whether these differentially relate to health behaviour. Participants (N = 146) completed questionnaire and behavioural measures of self-control, and reported their physical activity. A direct effect of self-reported self-control on physical activity was observed, qualified by an interaction between self-reported self-control and behavioural measures, whereby greater self-reported self-control was associated with greater engagement in physical activity among those who performed poorly on the stop-signal task and those who performed well on the Stroop task. These results appear to indicate that the combination of trait self-control and behavioural factors leads to facilitative or debilitative effects on behaviour. Self-report and behavioural measures of self-control do not appear to assess the same elements of self-control and should not be used interchangeably. It is suggested that these measurement modes reflect a difference between trait self-control and specific self-control processes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom137
dc.relation.ispartofpageto142
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPersonality and Individual Differences
dc.relation.ispartofvolume90
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleSelf-report and behavioural approaches to the measurement of self-control: Are we assessing the same construct?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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