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dc.contributor.authorDamgaard, Peter de Barros
dc.contributor.authorMargaryan, Ashot
dc.contributor.authorSchroeder, Hannes
dc.contributor.authorOrlando, Ludovic
dc.contributor.authorWillerslev, Eske
dc.contributor.authorAllentoft, Morten Erik
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T03:13:16Z
dc.date.available2017-11-30T03:13:16Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep11184
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172172
dc.description.abstractPoor DNA preservation is the most limiting factor in ancient genomic research. In the majority of ancient bones and teeth, endogenous DNA molecules represent a minor fraction of the whole DNA extract, rendering shot-gun sequencing inefficient for obtaining genomic data. Based on ancient human bone samples from temperate and tropical environments, we show that an EDTA-based enzymatic ‘pre-digestion’ of powdered bone increases the proportion of endogenous DNA several fold. By performing the pre-digestion step between 30 min and 6 hours on five bones, we observe an asymptotic increase in endogenous DNA content, with a 2.7-fold average increase reached at 1 hour. We repeat the experiment using a brief pre-digestion (15 or 30 mins) on 21 ancient bones and teeth from a variety of archaeological contexts and observe an improvement in 16 of these. We here advocate the implementation of a brief pre-digestion step as a standard procedure in ancient DNA extractions. Finally, we demonstrate on 14 ancient teeth that by targeting the outer layer of the roots we obtain up to 14 times more endogenous DNA than when using the inner dentine. Our presented methods are likely to increase the proportion of ancient samples that are suitable for genome-scale characterization.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Macmillan
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom11184-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto11184-12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060199
dc.titleImproving access to endogenous DNA in ancient bones and teeth
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2015. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWillerslev, Eske


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