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dc.contributor.authorJuras, Anna
dc.contributor.authorDabert, Miroslawa
dc.contributor.authorKushniarevich, Alena
dc.contributor.authorMalmstrom, Helena
dc.contributor.authorRaghavan, Maanasa
dc.contributor.authorKosicki, Jakub Z.
dc.contributor.authorMetspalu, Ene
dc.contributor.authorWillerslev, Eske
dc.contributor.authorPiontek, Janusz
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T05:38:19Z
dc.date.available2017-11-29T05:38:19Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0110839en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172193
dc.description.abstractWhile numerous ancient human DNA datasets from across Europe have been published till date, modern-day Poland in particular, remains uninvestigated. Besides application in the reconstruction of continent-wide human history, data from this region would also contribute towards our understanding of the history of the Slavs, whose origin is hypothesized to be in East or Central Europe. Here, we present the first population-scale ancient human DNA study from the region of modern-day Poland by establishing mitochondrial DNA profiles for 23 samples dated to 200 BC – 500 AD (Roman Iron Age) and for 20 samples dated to 1000–1400 AD (Medieval Age). Our results show that mitochondrial DNA sequences from both periods belong to haplogroups that are characteristic of contemporary West Eurasia. Haplotype sharing analysis indicates that majority of the ancient haplotypes are widespread in some modern Europeans, including Poles. Notably, the Roman Iron Age samples share more rare haplotypes with Central and Northeast Europeans, whereas the Medieval Age samples share more rare haplotypes with East-Central and South-East Europeans, primarily Slavic populations. Our data demonstrates genetic continuity of certain matrilineages (H5a1 and N1a1a2) in the area of present-day Poland from at least the Roman Iron Age until present. As such, the maternal gene pool of present-day Poles, Czechs and Slovaks, categorized as Western Slavs, is likely to have descended from inhabitants of East-Central Europe during the Roman Iron Age.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefromA1845-1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoA1845-9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS Oneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPopulation, Ecological and Evolutionary Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060411en_US
dc.titleAncient DNA reveals matrilineal continuity in present-day Poland over the last two millenniaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Juras, et. al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWillerslev, Eske


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