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dc.contributor.authorKaczmarek, Marlena C
dc.contributor.authorWare, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorCoulthard, Mark G
dc.contributor.authorMcEniery, Julie
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Stephen B
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T05:07:31Z
dc.date.available2017-10-26T05:07:31Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0152305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172238
dc.description.abstractBackground: Influenza virus predictably causes an annual epidemic resulting in a considerable burden of illness in Australia. Children are disproportionately affected and can experience severe illness and complications, which occasionally result in death. Methods: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study using data collated in the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry of influenza-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions over a 17-year period (1997–2013, inclusive) in children <16 years old. National laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications were used for comparison. Results: Between 1997 and 2013, a total of 704 influenza-related ICU admissions were recorded, at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 all-cause ICU admissions. Age at admission ranged from 0 days and 15.9 years (median = 2.1 years), with 135 (19.2%) aged <6 months. Pneumonia/pneumonitis and bronchiolitis were the most common primary diagnoses among influenza-related admissions (21.9% and 13.6%, respectively). More than half of total cases (59.2%) were previously healthy (no co-morbidities recorded), and in the remainder, chronic lung disease (16.7%) and asthma (12.5%) were the most common co-morbidities recorded. Pathogen co-detection occurred in 24.7% of cases, most commonly with respiratory syncytial virus or a staphylococcal species. Median length of all ICU admissions was 3.2 days (range 2.0 hours– 107.4 days) and 361 (51.3%) admissions required invasive respiratory support for a median duration of 4.3 days (range 0.2 hours– 107.5 days). There were 27 deaths recorded, 14 (51.9%) in children without a recorded co-morbidity. Conclusion: Influenza causes a substantial number of ICU admissions in Australian children each year with the majority occurring in previously healthy children.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0152305-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe0152305-12
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111706
dc.titleEpidemiology of Australian influenza-related paediatric intensive care unit admissions, 1997-2013
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Kaczmarek, et. al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWare, Robert
gro.griffith.authorLambert, Stephen B.


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