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dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Jeanne
dc.contributor.authorHill, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorWare, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorZiviani, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorDodrill, Pamela
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-16T23:30:37Z
dc.date.available2017-11-16T23:30:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0277-2116
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MPG.0000000000000669
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/172276
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of the study was to determine whether operant conditioning (OC) or systematic desensitization (SysD) intervention resulted in more improvements in dietary variety/intake, and more reductions in difficult mealtime behaviors. Methods: Children 2 to 6 years with autism spectrum disorder or with a nonmedically complex history were recruited. Feeding difficulties were confirmed based on clinical assessment. Participants were randomized to receive 10 OC or SysD sessions (parents could opt for intervention once per week, or intensively within a week). Immersive parent education was delivered across both arms. A 3-month review was provided to measure outcomes postintervention. Results: In total, 68 participants (87%) completed the study. There were no significant differences in outcome measures between the OC and SysD intervention groups from baseline to 3-month review. When the data were combined across both groups, however, significant improvements in primary outcome measures were observed (P < 0.05). Although not statistically significant, it was considered clinically significant that participants in the OC arm demonstrated more increases in dietary variety (mean difference 3.3 foods, 95% confidence interval −0.1 to 6.8, P = 0.06) compared with the SysD arm. There were limited differences in response observed between the autism spectrum disorder and nonmedically complex history groups, and the intensive and weekly arms. Conclusions: Favorable results were observed regardless of intervention, intensity, or etiological group. Results suggest that, when delivered to a protocol by experienced therapists and coupled with parent education, these 2 intervention approaches are effective. Further research is required in exploring these interventions across other subgroups, and examining outcomes for longer periods.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom680
dc.relation.ispartofpageto687
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
dc.relation.ispartofvolume60
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleMultidisciplinary intervention for childhood feeding difficulties
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWare, Robert


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